THE WEEKLY SHONEN JUMP ASSISTANT CHART

Recently I had a week off of work, and wanted to finish a project that I’ve never quite managed to push through, and my mind immediately went to KTR’s Comic Room, and their fantastic Jump Assistant’s Chart, which I’ve tried to do stuff with on and off with for YEARS.

A huge brunt of the work had previously been done with help from Twitter pal (and skilled Gintama novel translator) Hugh, who had gone over an earlier chart for me some time back, providing a lot of the more difficult and obscure author and series names, giving me a lot of room to work on newer entries and to more easily verify the authors’ existences.

So with some additional basic translating, redrawing, additions and subtractions based on my own research (and the solid gold that is the Media Art Database), I can now present you with an updated, translated chart of Jump authors, and the people who’ve worked under them!

CLICK THE IMAGE TO SEE THE ABSURD THING I HAVE WROUGHT

I’ll be revising and improving this whenever I get the chance, and would love to make more accessible or streamlined variants of it, but for the most part, I hope you enjoy this stupidly large chart. It’s pretty neat.

The work KTR has done here is phenomenal, and it’s been a joy to put together my own version of the chart, mostly as a personal resource for my own work, but also just as a thing to share with the community. So please feel free to use and share this chart as you like, but if you’re feeling particularly kind, drop me a few pennies over at Ko-Fi. It would be appreciated, and money earned that way goes straight back into the site and projects like this. Thank you.

UPDATE 16/09/18: Shiro Usazaki and their recently published assistant Kento Matsuura have been added to the chart.

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Review – Gigant volume 1 (Hiroya Oku)

-art by Hiroya Oku

Gigant volume 1
Story & Art: Hiroya Oku
Originally serialised in Big Comic Superior
Published by Shogakukan, 2018
Copy purchased from eBookJapan

All I wanna do is see you turn into a giant woman, a giant woman!
All I wanna be is someone who gets to see a giant woman
All I wanna do is help you turn into a giant woman, a giant woman!
All I wanna be is someone who gets to see a giant woman
‘Giant Woman’, by Rebecca Sugar, 2014

What is it?: Hiroya Oku, of Gantz and Inuyashiki fame, returns with a brand new series, tying the science fiction sensibilities of those two hits with the sexy and dramatic stylings of his original debut work, Hen.

Yamada Yoko is the son of a filmmaker, a bit of a do-nothing wastrel obsessed with media and making his own work, when he isn’t pleasuring himself to the latest blu-ray of his favourite huge-breasted porn actress, Papiko. Through unusual happenstance he becomes friends with Papiko, real name Chiho Johansson, right before she inherits a strange device from a strangely-dressed dying man, one that allows her to increase her size at will!

[CONTENT WARNING: Gigant deals with themes of physical and emotional abuse in relationships, both romantic and familial. These subjects will come up in the review, so be duly warned going in]

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Review – Hana ni Arashi volume 1

art by Luka Kobachi

Hana ni Arashi volume 1
Story & Art: Luka Kobachi
Originally serialised online @ Sunday Webry
Published by Shogakukan, 2018
Copy purchased from eBookJapan

There’s something about you
That takes my blues away
Life’s nothing without you
I can’t get through the days
I’ll never be cynical
‘Cause you wouldn’t have it
I believe in miracles, I believe in magic
-‘Unicron Loev’, by Raleigh Ritchie, 2016

What is it?: Nanoha and Chidori are two perfectly healthy teenage schoolgirls, spending time with their friends, running a literature club, going to class and hanging out together. They’re also secretly dating, sneaking bits of public affection out wherever they can.

From this core concept we get a series of short, sweet chapters, exploring the duo’s secret relationship with warmth and humour.

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Review – The Bride was a Boy

art by Chii, design by KC Fabellon

The Bride was a Boy
Story & Art: Chii
Translation: Beni Axia Conrad
Adaptation: Shanti Whitesides
Lettering & Retouch: Karis Page
Cover Design: KC Fabellon
Editor: Jenn Grunigen
Sensitivity Reader: Casey Lucas
Published by Seven Seas
Copy purchased via ComiXology UK

I won’t cry, I won’t cry
No, I won’t shed a tear
Just as long as you stand, stand by me
-“Stand by Me”, specifically as covered by Florence + the Machine (we’ll get to why that version at the end), 2016

What is it?: Originally presented as comic essays online, The Bride was a Boy is the collected, edited, and expanded autobiographical account of Chii’s life with her boyfriend (now husband), leading up to their engagement and marriage. This is all framed around Chii’s transition, both as a matter of fact account of how she started transitioning, early dysphoria, her sex reassignment surgery, and the process of having her legal status in Japan changed to female, and as a way of educating the reader as to correct terminology and information about transitioning and the trans experience, as it is to her.

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Comics I Read: Grand Jump 2018 Edition

cover art by Yoichi Takahashi

As of writing this piece, I’ve been reading Grand Jump for 15 issues, released twice a month since September last year, and it’s been an interesting journey compared to our last highlight for these, Weekly Shonen Sunday, being a magazine aimed at a much older audience; that of older Japanese businessmen (though as with all demographic stuff, this is largely an arbitrary designation). This means that the content is aimed at a much more mature audience, and presumably a more intelligent breed, doing away with the furigana (hiragana above kanji) that’s helped me keep my head juuuust about above water when reading, and as such I’m usually up s**t creek without a paddle reading this stuff.

But I’m nothing if not stubborn, and equipped with both a decent ability to kind of work stuff out visually when my own brain and dictionary/vocab reference lets me down, and manage to read some eleven of the magazine’s twenty(ish) series on a regular basis, all of which I’m going to talk about at some short length below. The vast majority of these aren’t talked about in western comics circles, and so I really wanna shed light on what are some of my all-time favourite comics. Let’s go.

BUY GRAND JUMP HERE

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